Tuesday, October 25, 2011

Gallery 1C03 and aceartinc. present a public film screening: The Story of the Coast Salish Knitters Directed by Christine Welsh


Gallery 1C03 and aceartinc. present a public film screening:

The Story of the Coast Salish Knitters
Directed by Christine Welsh

Wednesday, November 9, 7:00 p.m.
aceartinc.
2nd floor, 290 McDermot Avenue
Free Admission – Open to all!

This film screening is presented in conjunction with
Gallery 1C03's current programming initiative The Ephemerals: Trending. Trending began as a four-day performative embedment on The University of Winnipeg campus by The Ephemerals, an all-female Aboriginal collective of artists and curators. By inserting themselves into the university community, The Ephemerals have explored the trend of Indigenously-influenced clothing and accessories among post-secondary students, encouraging a critical reading of fashion as codified text and highlighting the need for a deeper awareness of its cultural implications. Further supporting this project is an ongoing intervention in the public display windows of the university’s Anthropology Museum, drawing from and responding to the Anthropology Department’s Ethnographic Collection, as well as a blog: www.theephemerals.wordpress.com.

Written and directed by Christine Welsh, The Story of the Coast Salish Knitters (Canada, 2000) draws attention to the identity of the creators of much-loved (and much-replicated) Cowichan sweaters. For almost a century, the Coast Salish knitters of southern Vancouver Island have produced Cowichan sweaters from handspun wool. These distinctive sweaters are known and loved around the world, but the Aboriginal women who make them remain largely invisible. Combining rare archival footage with the voices of three generations of woolworkers, The Story of the Coast Salish Knitters tells the tale of unsung heroines – resourceful women who knit to put food on the table and keep their families alive. This is a story of courage and cultural transformation – a celebration of the threads that connect the past to the future.

Christine Welsh is a M├ętis filmmaker, feminist and academic in Canada. She has produced, written and directed films for more than 30 years. Welsh's film credits include the 2006 National Film Board of Canada documentary Finding Dawn, about murdered and missing Canadian Aboriginal women. She is a resident of Saltspring Island. Welsh is an Associate Professor at the University of Victoria, where she teaches courses in Indigenous Women’s Studies.


Please stay after the film for some refreshments and discussion!

Gallery 1C03 gratefully acknowledges financial support of The University of Winnipeg and the Manitoba Arts Council for making this program possible. We are also grateful for the support of aceartinc.

Image: Scene from The Story of the Coast Salish Knitters, a film by Christine Welsh. Courtesy of the National Film Board of Canada.

Trending review in Uptown

We're playing a bit of catch up here, but read Sandee Moore's review of Trending in Uptown!

Ephemerals - Maiden Indian at ImagineNATIVE


The Ephemerals' Maiden Indian film was included in this review of the ImagineNATIVE festival called ImagineNATIVE short films: Ever loud, ever proud. Awesome!

Thursday, October 20, 2011

Gallery 1C03 looking for art educators


Gallery 1C03 at The University of Winnipeg is excited about what it does and wants to offer others opportunities to join in. We are presently looking for 1 or 2 people to join our team of volunteer art educators!

  • Are you interested in visual art?
  • Are you an Art History or Education student at the University of Winnipeg?
  • Are you creative and energetic?
  • Are you interested in gaining valuable experience that will stand out on your resume?

If you answered "yes" to these questions, then please read further!

Gallery 1C03 seeks students to plan and deliver art education workshops during the 2011-12 academic season. Workshops will consist of presenting information about Gallery 1C03 art exhibits to school aged children (grades 1 - 12) and facilitating creative responses to the exhibits. Each workshop is approximately 1 hour in duration.

If you have a background in teaching through the arts or want to develop these skills, please contact Art Curator Jennifer Gibson by calling 786-9253 or by sending an email to j.gibson@uwinnipeg.ca as soon as possible.

Monday, October 17, 2011

Jessica Metcalfe blog

Thanks to all who came out for Dr. Jessica Metcalfe's lecture on Friday! To keep up with her, check out her blog Beyond Buckskin.

Coats, culture, colonizers and cool

Check out Colleen Simard's article on fashion choices and colonization in this article from October 8, 2011 Winnipeg Free Press:
Coats, culture, colonizers and cool. She mentions The Ephemerals: Trending too!

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

Don't Forget to Check Out Dr. Jessica Metcalfe's Lecture Tomorrow!


Friday, October 14, 12:30 p.m.

Room 2C14 (2nd floor of Centennial Hall)

The University of Winnipeg

Free Admission


For more information, see the post below or check out our Facebook page.

Hope to see you there!

Wednesday, October 5, 2011

Lecture by Dr. Jessica Metcalfe


Gallery 1C03 proudly presents

"Threads of Power: Native Designers of High Fashion and Clothing as a Form of Resistance"

A public lecture by Dr. Jessica Metcalfe

Friday, October 14, 12:30 p.m.
Room 2C14 (2nd floor of Centennial Hall)
The University of Winnipeg
Free Admission

This public lecture is presented as part of Gallery 1C03’s current programming initiative The Ephemerals: Trending. Trending began as a four-day performative embedment on The University of Winnipeg campus by The Ephemerals, an all-female Aboriginal collective of artists and curators. By inserting themselves into the university community, The Ephemerals have explored the trend of Indigenously-influenced clothing and accessories among post-secondary students, encouraging a critical reading of fashion as codified text and highlighting the need for a deeper awareness of its cultural implications. Further supporting this project is an ongoing intervention in the public display windows of the university’s Anthropology Museum, drawing from and responding to the Anthropology Department’s Ethnographic Collection, as well as a blog.

In her lecture “Threads of Power: Native Designers of High Fashion and Clothing as a Form of Resistance”, Dr. Metcalfe will discuss how Native American fashion designers from different generations use clothing as a form of communication and as a way to continue age-old clothing practices, deconstruct stereotypes, subvert the mainstream fashion industry and create new opportunities for Native youth. Dr. Metcalfe’s presentation highlights the work of Lloyd Kiva New (Cherokee), Wendy Ponca (Osage), Virgil Ortiz (Cochiti Pueblo) and various Native American streetwear artists.

Dr. Jessica R. Metcalfe (Turtle Mountain Chippewa) earned her Ph.D. in American Indian Studies from the University of Arizona. She previously served as managing editor and contributor to Red Ink Magazine, and has taught courses in Native American Studies, Studio Art, Art History, Literature and Anthropology at tribal colleges and state universities. Her current work focuses on Native fashion design. She has presented at numerous national conferences, lectured at various museums and co-curated several exhibitions.

Gallery 1C03 gratefully acknowledges financial support of The University of Winnipeg and the Manitoba Arts Council for making this program possible. We are also grateful for the support of Urban Shaman Contemporary Aboriginal Art Gallery.

Image: Wendy Ponca (Osage), Ceremonial Attitude for the New Millennium, 1996, mylar, feathers and body paint. Courtesy of the artist.